The Best Images from the 2017 Solar Eclipse

posted by Katherine Tyler -

President Donald Trump looks up toward the Solar Eclipse while joined by his wife first lady Melania Trump on the Truman Balcony at the White House on August 21, 2017 in Washington, DC. Millions of people have flocked to areas of the U.S. that are in the "path of totality" in order to experience a total solar eclipse.

Photo: Getty Images

U.S. President Donald Trump looks up toward the Solar Eclipse while standing with his wife first lady Melania Trump and their son Barron, on the Truman Balcony at the White House on August 21, 2017 in Washington, DC. Millions of people have flocked to areas of the U.S. that are in the "path of totality" in order to experience a total solar eclipse.

Photo: Getty Images

U.S.President Donald Trump puts on special glasses to look at the Solar Eclipse on the Truman Balcony at the White House on August 21, 2017 in Washington, DC. Millions of people have flocked to areas of the U.S. that are in the "path of totality" in order to experience a total solar eclipse.

Photo: Getty Images

US President Donald Trump and his wife first lady Melania Trump wear special glasses to view the solar eclipse at the White House on August 21, 2017 in Washington, DC. Millions of people have flocked to areas of the U.S. that are in the "path of totality" in order to experience a total solar eclipse.

Photo: Getty Images

U.S. President Donald Trump, first lady Melania Trump and their son Barron Trump wear special glasses to view the solar eclipse from the Truman Balcony at the White House on August 21, 2017 in Washington, DC. Millions of people have flocked to areas of the U.S. that are in the "path of totality" in order to experience a total solar eclipse.

Photo: Getty Images

Brothers Chris and Gabe Fabiano watch the first solar eclipse to sweep across the United States in over 99 years on the beach August 21, 2017 on Hilton Head Island, South Carolina. Millions of people are expected to watch as the eclipse cuts a path of totality 70 miles wide across the United States from Oregon to South Carolina.

Photo: Getty Images

Solar eclipse watchers build a "sand eclipse" on the beach, hoping to view the total solar eclipse if the weather clears on August 21, 2017 in Isle of Palms, South Carolina. It's been 99 years since a total solar eclipse crossed the country from the Pacific to the Atlantic. Millions of people have flocked to areas of the U.S. that are in the "path of totality" in order to experience a total solar eclipse. During the event, the moon will pass in between the sun and the Earth, appearing to block the sun. Isle of Palms is one of last vantage points where totality will be visible. (Photo by Pete Marovich/Getty Images)

Photo: Getty Images

Solar eclipse watchers on the beach hoping to view the total solar eclipse if the weather clears on August 21, 2017 in Isle of Palms, South Carolina. It's been 99 years since a total solar eclipse crossed the country from the Pacific to the Atlantic. Millions of people have flocked to areas of the U.S. that are in the "path of totality" in order to experience a total solar eclipse. During the event, the moon will pass in between the sun and the Earth, appearing to block the sun. Isle of Palms is one of last vantage points where totality will be visible.

Photo: Getty Images

Mark and Molly Moser, from Denver, Colorado, watch the first solar eclipse to sweep across the United States in over 99 years in the Atlantic Ocean August 21, 2017 on Hilton Head Island, South Carolina. Millions of people are expected to watch as the eclipse cuts a path of totality 70 miles wide across the United States from Oregon to South Carolina.

Photo: Getty Images

Molly Moser, from Denver, Colorado, watches the first solar eclipse to sweep across the United States in over 99 years in the Atlantic Ocean August 21, 2017 on Hilton Head Island, South Carolina. Millions of people are expected to watch as the eclipse cuts a path of totality 70 miles wide across the United States from Oregon to South Carolina.

Photo: Getty Images

People watch the solar eclipse at Saluki Stadium on the campus of Southern Illinois University on August 21, 2017 in Carbondale, Illinois. Although much of it was covered by a cloud, with approximately 2 minutes 40 seconds of totality the area in Southern Illinois experienced the longest duration of totality during the eclipse. Millions of people are expected to watch as the eclipse cuts a path of totality 70 miles wide across the United States from Oregon to South Carolina on August 21.

Photo: Getty Images

People watch the total solar eclipse in Charleston, South Carolina, on August 21, 2017. Emotional sky-gazers stood transfixed across North America Monday as the Sun vanished behind the Moon in a rare total eclipse that swept the continent coast-to-coast for the first time in nearly a century.

Photo: Getty Images

Members of the Rome Braves watch the eclipse at Spirit Communications Park during a break in minor league baseball August 21, 2017 in Columbia, South Carolina. The astrological occurrence marks the first transcontinental total solar eclipse in 99 years.

Photo: Getty Images

Multiple exposures were combined in camera to produce this image.) In-camera multiple exposure of the solar eclipse as seen in Salem, Ore., on Aug. 21, 2017.

Photo: Getty Images

A partial eclipse is seen from South Mike Sedar Park on August 21, 2017 in Casper, Wyoming. Millions of people have flocked to areas of the U.S. that are in the "path of totality" in order to experience a total solar eclipse. During the event, the moon will pass in between the sun and the Earth, appearing to block the sun.

Photo: Getty Images

A partial eclipse is seen from South Mike Sedar Park on August 21, 2017 in Casper, Wyoming. Millions of people have flocked to areas of the U.S. that are in the "path of totality" in order to experience a total solar eclipse. During the event, the moon will pass in between the sun and the Earth, appearing to block the sun.

Photo: Getty Images

The solar eclipse is seen through dark eclipse glasses at The Phillip and Patricia Frost Museum of Science on August 21, 2017 in Miami, Florida. While Miami was not in the path of totality for the solar eclipse, around 77 percent of the sun was covered by the moon during the peak time of the partial eclipse.

Photo: Getty Images

A near total eclipse is seen from South Mike Sedar Park on August 21, 2017 in Casper, Wyoming. Millions of people have flocked to areas of the U.S. that are in the "path of totality" in order to experience a total solar eclipse. During the event, the moon will pass in between the sun and the Earth, appearing to block the sun.

Photo: Getty Images

The sun is is in full eclipse over Grand Teton National Park on August 21, 2017 outside Jackson, Wyoming. Thousands of people have flocked to the Jackson and Teton National Park area for the 2017 solar eclipse which will be one of the areas that will experience a 100% eclipse on Monday August 21, 2017.

Photo: Getty Images

The solar eclipse reaches partial totality on August 21, 2017 in Amity, Oregon. Millions of people are expected to watch as the eclipse cuts a path of totality 70 miles wide across the United States from Oregon to South Carolina.

Photo: Getty Images

The sun is eclipsed by the moon over top of the Empire State Building in New York City on August 21, 2017.

Photo: Getty Images

A couple use a viewing box during the solar eclipse at 'Top of the Rock' observatory at Rockefeller Center, August 21, 2017 in New York City. While New York City is not in the path of totality for the solar eclipse, around 72 percent of the sun will be covered by the moon during the peak time of the partial eclipse.

Photo: Getty Images

Joanna Anato-Lopez and Javier Lopez view the solar eclipse at The Phillip and Patricia Frost Museum of Science on August 21, 2017 in Miami, Florida. While Miami was not in the path of totality for the solar eclipse, around 77 percent of the sun was covered by the moon during the peak time of the partial eclipse.

Photo: Getty Images

Marching band members Ashton Websterand Haley Stellmach watch the solar eclipse at Saluki Stadium on the campus of Southern Illinois University on August 21, 2017 in Carbondale, Illinois. Although much of it was covered by a cloud, with approximately 2 minutes 40 seconds of totality the area in Southern Illinois experienced the longest duration of totality during the eclipse. Millions of people are expected to watch as the eclipse cuts a path of totality 70 miles wide across the United States from Oregon to South Carolina on August 21.

Photo: Getty Images

Convention goers step outside of the Marriott Resort and Spa at Grande Dunes to catch a glimpse of the solar eclipse August 21, 2017 in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. Myrtle Beach was supposed to see 99-percent coverage of the sun by the moon but heavy cloud cover prevented people from seeing the moment of most coverage.

Photo: Getty Images

Convention goers step outside of the Marriott Resort and Spa at Grande Dunes to catch a glimpse of the solar eclipse August 21, 2017 in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. Myrtle Beach was supposed to see 99-percent coverage of the sun by the moon but heavy cloud cover prevented people from seeing the moment of most coverage.

Photo: Getty Images

Helen Carroll (R) and her daughter Carrie watch the solar eclipse at Saluki Stadium on the campus of Southern Illinois University on August 21, 2017 in Carbondale, Illinois. Although much of it was covered by a cloud, with approximately 2 minutes 40 seconds of totality the area in Southern Illinois experienced the longest duration of totality during the eclipse. Millions of people are expected to watch as the eclipse cuts a path of totality 70 miles wide across the United States from Oregon to South Carolina on August 21.

Photo: Getty Images

People look at an image of the partial solar eclipse in downtown Washington, DC, August 21, 2017. The Great American Eclipse completed its journey across the United States Monday, with the path of totality stretching coast-to-coast for the first time in nearly a century.

Photo: Getty Images

People watch the total solar eclipse in Charleston, South Carolina, on August 21, 2017. Emotional sky-gazers stood transfixed across North America Monday as the Sun vanished behind the Moon in a rare total eclipse that swept the continent coast-to-coast for the first time in nearly a century.

Photo: Getty Images

People pose for a selfie during an eclipse on the National Mall August 21, 2017 in Washington, DC. The Great American Eclipse completed its journey across the United States Monday, with the path of totality stretching coast-to-coast for the first time in nearly a century. Totality began over Oregon at about 1716 GMT and ended at 1848 GMT over Charleston, South Carolina where sky-gazers whooped and cheered as the Moon moved directly in front of the Sun.

Photo: Getty Images

People view the solar eclipse at 'Top of the Rock' observatory at Rockefeller Center, August 21, 2017 in New York City. While New York City is not in the path of totality for the solar eclipse, around 72 percent of the sun will be covered by the moon during the peak time of the partial eclipse.

Photo: Getty Images

People gather to watch the total solar eclipse, at Carhenge, on August 21, 2017 in Alliance, Nebraska.

Photo: Getty Images

Vineyards watch as the solar eclipse nears totality on August 21, 2017 in Amity, Oregon. Millions of people are expected to watch as the eclipse cuts a path of totality 70 miles wide across the United States from Oregon to South Carolina.

Photo: Getty Images

Spectators at Zivo Vineyards watch as the solar eclipse nears totality on August 21, 2017 in Amity, Oregon. Millions of people are expected to watch as the eclipse cuts a path of totality 70 miles wide across the United States from Oregon to South Carolina.

Photo: Getty Images